[X] CLOSEMAIN MENU

  • Archives

  • Categories

    • Announcements (574)
    • Antibacterial (110)
    • Aquaculture (20)
    • Beneficials (18)
    • Biodiversity (13)
    • Biofuels (6)
    • Biological Control (8)
    • Biomonitoring (26)
    • Canada (3)
    • Cannabis (17)
    • Children/Schools (207)
    • Climate Change (28)
    • contamination (31)
    • Environmental Justice (102)
    • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (33)
    • Events (79)
    • Farmworkers (100)
    • Fracking (1)
    • Golf (11)
    • Health care (30)
    • Holidays (24)
    • Integrated and Organic Pest Management (49)
    • International (274)
    • Invasive Species (27)
    • Label Claims (43)
    • Lawns/Landscapes (173)
    • Litigation (263)
    • Nanotechnology (52)
    • National Politics (378)
    • Pesticide Drift (116)
    • Pesticide Regulation (630)
    • Pesticide Residues (129)
    • Pets (17)
    • Preemption (1)
    • Resistance (65)
    • Rodenticide (21)
    • Take Action (363)
    • Uncategorized (80)
    • Wildlife/Endangered Sp. (298)
    • Wood Preservatives (21)
  • Most Viewed Posts

Daily News Blog

Archive for the 'Lupus' Category


30
Oct

Lupus and other Autoimmune Diseases Linked to Insecticide Use

(Beyond Pesticides, October 30, 2009) A recent study shows that women who use insecticides are at elevated risk for autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. The results of the yet unpublished study were presented on October 17, 2009 at the American College of Rheumatology annual meeting in Philadelphia, PA. The study, which looked at more than 75,000 women, shows that those who spray insecticides at least six times per year have almost two and a half times the risk of developing lupus and rheumatoid arthritis versus those who do not use insecticides. The risk doubles if insecticides were used in the home for 20 years or more. Hiring a gardener or commercial company to apply insecticides also resulted in a doubling of risk, but only if they were used long-term, says Christine G. Parks, PhD, an epidemiologist with the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in Research Triangle Park, N.C., one of the lead researchers who analyzed data from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Observational Study. “Our new results provide support for the idea that environmental factors may increase susceptibility or trigger the development of autoimmune diseases in some individuals,” said Dr. Parks. While the study does not […]

Share