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Daily News Blog

31
Jul

Take Action: Involuntary Spontaneous Abortions Linked to EPA-Registered Pesticides

(Beyond Pesticides, July 31, 2023) As the national debates on the rights of women to make health decisions about their bodies in the context of abortions, the scientific literature is increasingly documenting involuntary spontaneous abortions and other reproductive effects associated with pesticide exposure—raising critical questions about the ability to control one’s health. Last week, Beyond Pesticides reported on an exploratory study, published in Environment International, that adds to the many studies demonstrating residential prenatal pesticide exposure can result in adverse birth outcomes. Residential exposure to five active pesticide ingredients (Ais) fluroxypyr-meptyl, glufosinate-ammonium, linuron, vinclozolin, and picoxystrobin has adverse effects on gestational age (GA), birth weight (BW), mortality after birth, child’s sex, premature development, low birth weight (LBW), small for gestational age (SGA), and large for gestational age (LGA). 

Despite the political furor surrounding medical abortions, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues to allow pesticides that cause involuntary spontaneous abortions (miscarriages) and other reproductive effects in exposed women.

Tell EPA to ban pesticides that cause involuntary spontaneous abortions (miscarriages) and other reproductive effects. Tell Congress to ensure that EPA does not permit the use of pesticides affecting reproduction. 

Most spontaneous abortions occur during the first trimester. The most common cause of miscarriage during the first trimester is chromosomal abnormality. Pesticide-induced chromosomal abnormalities may be seen in a damaged egg or sperm cell. Female farmworkers are particularly at risk, though exposure of the father to pesticides also increases the risk of spontaneous abortion. 

Pesticides are ubiquitous in the environment, with 90 percent of Americans having at least one pesticide compound in their body. Numerous studies indicate chemical exposure mainly stems from dietary exposure, like food and drinking water. Although many countries ban most organochlorine compounds, these chemicals remain in soils, water (solid and liquid), and the surrounding air at levels exceeding U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards. These compounds have a global distribution, with evaporation and precipitation facilitating long-range atmospheric transport, deposition, and bioaccumulation of hazardous chemicals in the environment. Thus, exposure to these toxicants can cause many adverse environmental and biological health effects, including spontaneous abortions. The scientific literature demonstrates pesticides’ long history of severe adverse effects on human health (i.e., endocrine disruption, cancer, reproductive/birth problems, neurotoxicity, etc.) and wildlife, and biodiversity. With the increasing ubiquity of pesticides, current measures safeguarding against pesticide use and exposure must be improved. 

The presence of pesticides in the body has implications for human health, especially during vulnerable life stages like childhood, puberty, pregnancy, and old age. Pesticide exposure during pregnancy is of specific concern both because of the risk of spontaneous abortion and the health effects of those who survive, as well as to future generations. Just as nutrients are transferable between mother and fetus, so are chemical contaminants. Studies find pesticide compounds in a mother’s blood can transfer to the fetus via the umbilical cord. A 2021 study finds pregnant women already have over 100 chemicals in blood and umbilical cord samples, including banned persistent organic pollutants.  

Despite the evidence, EPA continues to allow the use of pesticides causing spontaneous abortion and other reproductive effects. It is time to ban these pesticides. 

Tell EPA to ban pesticides that cause involuntary spontaneous abortions (miscarriages) and other reproductive effects. Tell Congress to ensure that EPA does not permit the use of pesticides affecting reproduction.

Letter to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Despite the public attention to medical abortions, EPA continues to allow pesticides that cause involuntary spontaneous abortions (miscarriages) and other reproductive effects in exposed women. 

Most spontaneous abortions occur during the first trimester. The most common cause of miscarriage during the first trimester is chromosomal abnormality. Pesticide-induced chromosomal abnormalities may be seen in a damaged egg or sperm cell. Female farmworkers are particularly at risk, though exposure of the father to pesticides also increases the risk of spontaneous abortion.

Pesticides are ubiquitous in the environment, with 90 percent of Americans having at least one pesticide compound in their body. Numerous studies indicate chemical exposure mainly stems from dietary exposure, like food and drinking water. Although many countries ban most organochlorine compounds, these chemicals remain in soils, water (solid and liquid), and the surrounding air at levels exceeding U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards. These compounds have a global distribution, with evaporation and precipitation facilitating long-range atmospheric transport, deposition, and bioaccumulation of hazardous chemicals in the environment. Thus, exposure to these toxicants can cause many adverse environmental and biological health effects, including spontaneous abortions. The scientific literature demonstrates pesticides’ long history of severe adverse effects on human health (i.e., endocrine disruption, cancer, reproductive/birth problems, neurotoxicity, etc.) and wildlife, and biodiversity. With the increasing ubiquity of pesticides, current measures safeguarding against pesticide use and exposure must be improved.

The presence of pesticides in the body has implications for human health, especially during vulnerable life stages like childhood, puberty, pregnancy, and old age. Pesticide exposure during pregnancy is of specific concern both because of the risk of spontaneous abortion and the health effects of those who survive, as well as to future generations.  Just as nutrients are transferable between mother and fetus, so are chemical contaminants. Studies find pesticide compounds in a mother’s blood can transfer to the fetus via the umbilical cord. A 2021 study finds pregnant women already have over 100 chemicals in blood and umbilical cord samples, including banned persistent organic pollutants. 

In spite of the evidence, EPA continues to allow the use of pesticides causing involuntary spontaneous abortion and other reproductive effects. It is time to ban these pesticides.

Thank you.

Letter to U.S. Members of Congress

Despite the public attention to medical abortions, EPA continues to allow pesticides that cause involuntary spontaneous abortions (miscarriages) and other reproductive effects in exposed women. 

Most spontaneous abortions occur during the first trimester. The most common cause of miscarriage during the first trimester is chromosomal abnormality. Pesticide-induced chromosomal abnormalities may be seen in a damaged egg or sperm cell. Female farmworkers are particularly at risk, though exposure of the father to pesticides also increases the risk of spontaneous abortion.

Pesticides are ubiquitous in the environment, with 90 percent of Americans having at least one pesticide compound in their body. Numerous studies indicate chemical exposure mainly stems from dietary exposure, like food and drinking water. Although many countries ban most organochlorine compounds, these chemicals remain in soils, water (solid and liquid), and the surrounding air at levels exceeding U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards. These compounds have a global distribution, with evaporation and precipitation facilitating long-range atmospheric transport, deposition, and bioaccumulation of hazardous chemicals in the environment. Thus, exposure to these toxicants can cause many adverse environmental and biological health effects, including spontaneous abortions. The scientific literature demonstrates pesticides’ long history of severe adverse effects on human health (i.e., endocrine disruption, cancer, reproductive/birth problems, neurotoxicity, etc.) and wildlife, and biodiversity. With the increasing ubiquity of pesticides, current measures safeguarding against pesticide use and exposure must be improved.

The presence of pesticides in the body has implications for human health, especially during vulnerable life stages like childhood, puberty, pregnancy, and old age. Pesticide exposure during pregnancy is of specific concern both because of the risk of spontaneous abortion and the health effects of those who survive, as well as to future generations.  Just as nutrients are transferable between mother and fetus, so are chemical contaminants. Studies find pesticide compounds in a mother’s blood can transfer to the fetus via the umbilical cord. A 2021 study finds pregnant women already have over 100 chemicals in blood and umbilical cord samples, including banned persistent organic pollutants. 

In spite of the evidence, EPA continues to allow the use of pesticides causing involuntary spontaneous abortion and other reproductive effects. I request that you, in your oversight capacity, tell EPA that it is time to ban these pesticides.

Thank you.

Share

7 Responses to “Take Action: Involuntary Spontaneous Abortions Linked to EPA-Registered Pesticides”

  1. 1
    Sheila Tran Says:

    The EPA needs to ban pesticides that cause miscarriages and other reproductive effects and Congress needs to make sure that they don’t permit this.

  2. 2
    Thomas Libbey Says:

    please stop the pesticides.

  3. 3
    Paula Morgan Says:

    Natural abortions occur. It’s the body’s way of ridding the pregnancy. This often happens with a first pregnancy. Many are caused by our living conditions like pollution, dirty air or water, for we eat which has little to no nutrition, and more. Yet women today, after Roe, can not get medical attention due to the MAGA demands, the religious demands, or just idiocy of others. Women don’t deserve to be harmed so that they can no linger carry pregnancies. yet his is happening today in America! I feel this is wrong. No one should have that power especially not the ignorant among us who listen to others What ever happened to the Golden Rule? Do unto others which you would have done unto yourself.

  4. 4
    Tracy Feldman Says:

    Please regulate these and any chemicals known to have adverse effects on humans and non-target organisms.

  5. 5
    Isabel Cervera Says:

    Despite the public attention to medical abortions, EPA continues to allow pesticides that cause involuntary spontaneous abortions (miscarriages) and other reproductive effects in exposed women.

    Most spontaneous abortions occur during the first trimester. The most common cause of miscarriage during the first trimester is chromosomal abnormality. Pesticide-induced chromosomal abnormalities may be seen in a damaged egg or sperm cell. Female farmworkers are particularly at risk, though exposure of the father to pesticides also increases the risk of spontaneous abortion.

    Pesticides are ubiquitous in the environment, with 90 percent of Americans having at least one pesticide compound in their body. Numerous studies indicate chemical exposure mainly stems from dietary exposure, like food and drinking water. Although many countries ban most organochlorine compounds, these chemicals remain in soils, water (solid and liquid), and the surrounding air at levels exceeding U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards. These compounds have a global distribution, with evaporation and precipitation facilitating long-range atmospheric transport, deposition, and bioaccumulation of hazardous chemicals in the environment. Thus, exposure to these toxicants can cause many adverse environmental and biological health effects, including spontaneous abortions. The scientific literature demonstrates pesticides’ long history of severe adverse effects on human health (i.e., endocrine disruption, cancer, reproductive/birth problems, neurotoxicity, etc.) and wildlife, and biodiversity. With the increasing ubiquity of pesticides, current measures safeguarding against pesticide use and exposure must be improved.

    The presence of pesticides in the body has implications for human health, especially during vulnerable life stages like childhood, puberty, pregnancy, and old age. Pesticide exposure during pregnancy is of specific concern both because of the risk of spontaneous abortion and the health effects of those who survive, as well as to future generations. Just as nutrients are transferable between mother and fetus, so are chemical contaminants. Studies find pesticide compounds in a mother’s blood can transfer to the fetus via the umbilical cord. A 2021 study finds pregnant women already have over 100 chemicals in blood and umbilical cord samples, including banned persistent organic pollutants.

    In spite of the evidence, EPA continues to allow the use of pesticides causing involuntary spontaneous abortion and other reproductive effects. I request that you, in your oversight capacity, tell EPA that it is time to ban these pesticides.

    Thank you.

  6. 6
    Stacey McRae Says:

    Ban Pesticides and support organic farming!

  7. 7
    Marcelo Says:

    NO MORE PESTICIDES¡¡¡¡¡

Leave a Reply

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