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Daily News Blog

05
Jun

Take Action: With Butterfly Decline Mounting, EPA Allows Continued Pesticide Use that Causes Threat

(Beyond Pesticides, June 5, 2023) Butterflies—the most attractive of our insect fauna—are disappearing at an appalling rate, largely due to pesticide use. Recent studies have documented declines of almost 50% from 1990 to 2011 in Europe (with trends continuing), of 58 percent between 2000 and 2009 in the U.K., and of 33% from 1996–2016 in the state of Ohio in the U.S. Even steeper declines have been documented for Monarch butterflies, with an 80 percent decline of Eastern monarchs and 99 percent decline of Western monarchs.

Tell EPA to eliminate pesticides that threaten butterflies. Tell the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Department of Interior to help bring back butterflies by eliminating the use of pesticides that threaten them. Tell Congress that EPA and other agencies need to do their job and protect our most charismatic insects.

Last year, EPA admitted that three neonicotinoid pesticides are “likely to adversely affect from two-thirds to over three-fourths of America’s endangered species—1,225 to 1,445 species in all,” including many butterfly species. On May 5 of this year, EPA released new analyses of these neonics’ effects on endangered species. EPA’s analyses focus on the species most at risk of extinction, and the results represent a “five-alarm fire,” according to the Center for Biological Diversity’s environmental health director, Lori Ann Bird. EPA identifies 25 insect species and upwards of 160 plants dependent on insect pollination whose existence is most perilous.

Studies upon studies upon studies show that pesticides are a major contributor to the loss of insect biomass and diversity known as the “insect apocalypse,” particularly in combination with climate change. Insects are important as pollinators and as part of the food web that supports all life, so the loss of insects is a threat to life on Earth. The problem is not just insecticides, however. Since butterflies depend on plants—sometimes specific plants, as monarchs depend on milkweeds—the widespread use of herbicides is also a major factor in the loss of butterflies.

At a more foundational level, pesticides that support industrial agriculture eliminate habitat—either through outright destruction or through toxic contamination. In much of the U.S., agricultural fields are bare for half the year and support a single plant species for the other half. The difference between industrial agriculture and organic agriculture is that through their organic systems plans, organic producers are required to conserve—protect and increase—biodiversity.

Letter to EPA:

Butterflies—the most charismatic of our insect fauna—are disappearing at an appalling rate, largely due to pesticide use. Recent studies have documented declines of almost 50% from 1990 to 2011 in Europe (with trends continuing), of 58 percent between 2000 and 2009 in the U.K., and of 33% over 1996–2016 in the state of Ohio in the U.S. Even steeper declines have been documented for Monarch butterflies, with an 80 percent decline of Eastern monarchs and 99 percent decline of Western monarchs.

Last year the EPA admitted that three neonicotinoid pesticides are “likely to adversely affect from two-thirds to over three-fourths of America’s endangered species—1,225 to 1,445 species in all,” including many butterfly species. On May 5 of this year, EPA released new analyses of these neonics’ effects on endangered species. EPA’s analyses focus on the species most at risk of extinction, and the results represent a “five-alarm fire,” according to the Center for Biological Diversity’s environmental health director, Lori Ann Bird. EPA identifies 25 insect species and upwards of 160 plants dependent on insect pollination whose existence is most perilous.

Many studies show that pesticides are a major contributor to the loss of insect biomass and diversity known as the “insect apocalypse,” particularly in combination with climate change. Insects are important as pollinators and as part of the food web that supports all life, so the loss of insects is a threat to life on Earth. The problem is not just insecticides, however. Since butterflies depend on plants—sometimes specific plants, as monarchs depend on milkweeds—the widespread use of herbicides is also a major factor in the loss of butterflies.

At a more foundational level, pesticides that support industrial agriculture eliminate habitat—either through outright destruction or through toxic contamination. In much of the U.S., agricultural fields are bare for half the year and support a single plant species for the other half. The difference between industrial agriculture and organic agriculture is that through their organic systems plans, organic producers are required to conserve—protect and increase—biodiversity.

Please eliminate pesticides that threaten butterflies.

Thank you.

Letter to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service  and Dept. of Interior:

Butterflies—the most charismatic of our insect fauna—are disappearing at an appalling rate, largely due to pesticide use. Recent studies have documented declines of almost 50% from 1990 to 2011 in Europe (with trends continuing), of 58 percent between 2000 and 2009 in the U.K., and of 33% over 1996–2016 in the state of Ohio in the U.S. Even steeper declines have been documented for Monarch butterflies, with an 80 percent decline of Eastern monarchs and 99 percent decline of Western monarchs.

Last year the EPA admitted that three neonicotinoid pesticides are “likely to adversely affect from two-thirds to over three-fourths of America’s endangered species—1,225 to 1,445 species in all,” including many butterfly species. On May 5 of this year, EPA released new analyses of these neonics’ effects on endangered species. EPA’s analyses focus on the species most at risk of extinction, and the results represent a “five-alarm fire,” according to the Center for Biological Diversity’s environmental health director, Lori Ann Bird. EPA identifies 25 insect species and upwards of 160 plants dependent on insect pollination whose existence is most perilous.

Many studies show that pesticides are a major contributor to the loss of insect biomass and diversity known as the “insect apocalypse,” particularly in combination with climate change. Insects are important as pollinators and as part of the food web that supports all life, so the loss of insects is a threat to life on Earth. The problem is not just insecticides, however. Since butterflies depend on plants—sometimes specific plants, as monarchs depend on milkweeds—the widespread use of herbicides is also a major factor in the loss of butterflies.

At a more foundational level, pesticides that support industrial agriculture eliminate habitat—either through outright destruction or through toxic contamination. In much of the U.S., agricultural fields are bare for half the year and support a single plant species for the other half. The difference between industrial agriculture and organic agriculture is that through their organic systems plans, organic producers are required to conserve—protect and increase—biodiversity.

Please help bring back butterflies by eliminating the use of pesticides that threaten them on public lands.

Thank you.

Letter to U.S. Senators and Representative:

Butterflies—the most charismatic of our insect fauna—are disappearing at an appalling rate, largely due to pesticide use. Recent studies have documented declines of almost 50% from 1990 to 2011 in Europe (with trends continuing), of 58 percent between 2000 and 2009 in the U.K., and of 33% over 1996–2016 in the state of Ohio in the U.S. Even steeper declines have been documented for Monarch butterflies, with an 80 percent decline of Eastern monarchs and 99 percent decline of Western monarchs.

Last year the EPA admitted that three neonicotinoid pesticides are “likely to adversely affect from two-thirds to over three-fourths of America’s endangered species—1,225 to 1,445 species in all,” including many butterfly species. On May 5 of this year, EPA released new analyses of these neonics’ effects on endangered species. EPA’s analyses focus on the species most at risk of extinction, and the results represent a “five-alarm fire,” according to the Center for Biological Diversity’s environmental health director, Lori Ann Bird. EPA identifies 25 insect species and upwards of 160 plants dependent on insect pollination whose existence is most perilous.

Many studies show that pesticides are a major contributor to the loss of insect biomass and diversity known as the “insect apocalypse,” particularly in combination with climate change. Insects are important as pollinators and as part of the food web that supports all life, so the loss of insects is a threat to life on Earth. The problem is not just insecticides, however. Since butterflies depend on plants—sometimes specific plants, as monarchs depend on milkweeds—the widespread use of herbicides is also a major factor in the loss of butterflies.

At a more foundational level, pesticides that support industrial agriculture eliminate habitat—either through outright destruction or through toxic contamination. In much of the U.S., agricultural fields are bare for half the year and support a single plant species for the other half. The difference between industrial agriculture and organic agriculture is that through their organic systems plans, organic producers are required to conserve—protect and increase—biodiversity.

Please ensure that EPA and other agencies need to do their job and protect our most charismatic insects.

Thank you.

 

 

Share

20 Responses to “Take Action: With Butterfly Decline Mounting, EPA Allows Continued Pesticide Use that Causes Threat”

  1. 1
    Renee Bracey Says:

    Thanks for the update information Bracey Aklaya

  2. 2
    Ahmad Mahdavi Says:

    This is a personal observation dates back to more than 50 years ago: when in Arak a city in the center of Iran somewhere between grape vineyards and mountains I observed minutes, more than 5 minutes of a big big population of Nymphalid butterflies migrating, I can say billions, perhaps Vanesa cardui, but now I cannot see any and only when I climb I can see some butterflies up there, this is a scary story about what we have done to this planet, all beauties gone, nothing for next generations, unfortunately UN agencies only post some stories and despite our call for help during past 2-3 decades we cannot see any real actions, now we are observing a sharp decline in populations of many insect orders in developing countries due to unregulated use of agrochemicals and we are waiting to see some actions from related responsible global authorities!?

  3. 3
    Patricia Chambers Says:

    It’s past time by decades to stop the sale of these pesticides. They’re not only killing useful insects and animals but making humans sick. Do your jobs and ban this crud.

  4. 4
    Dave Delson Says:

    stop monsanto from making butterfly killing pesticides

  5. 5
    Linda Gazzola Says:

    STOP THESE PESTICIDES THAT ARE KILLING OUR WILDLIFE/ANIMALS/INSECTS!!!!!!!!!

  6. 6
    Darla Kravetz Says:

    Stop using pesticides. Save our butterflies.

  7. 7
    Corey Schade Says:

    PA and other agencies need to do their job and protect our flora and fauna!

  8. 8
    Paula Morgan Says:

    The butterflies are still in crises. The EPA knows this but still does nothing to assist. Bayer and Monsanto are telling lies that they will change their product so it won’t harm butterflies and bees but I no longer believe corporations that greenwash the problem but don’t bother to solve the problem. Why not put Milk Thistle bushes on the medians of highways” Plant Clover for bees as it only has to be mowed 4 times a year. It looks nice and cleans up the soil. This would keep butterflies around until a. more permanent solution can be found and help the bees. But there can be no insecticides! Thanks.

  9. 9
    priscilla martinez Says:

    Wildlife are God’s creations, we need to take better care of them, and their environment.

  10. 10
    Suzanne Torkar Says:

    Please stop Using Pesticides that are damaging to Butterflies! They are going to become extinct! We need them in this world as well as the plants and other areas you are spraying with this stuff that is killing them!

  11. 11
    Kathy Kushman Says:

    We need to protect our world from toxins.

  12. 12
    Lenore Sivulich Says:

    Butterflies—the most charismatic of our insect fauna—are disappearing at an appalling rate, largely due to pesticide use. Recent studies have documented declines of almost 50% from 1990 to 2011 in Europe (with trends continuing), of 58 percent between 2000 and 2009 in the U.K., and of 33% over 1996–2016 in the state of Ohio in the U.S. Even steeper declines have been documented for Monarch butterflies, with an 80 percent decline of Eastern monarchs and 99 percent decline of Western monarchs.

    Last year the EPA admitted that three neonicotinoid pesticides are “likely to adversely affect from two-thirds to over three-fourths of America’s endangered species—1,225 to 1,445 species in all,” including many butterfly species. On May 5 of this year, EPA released new analyses of these neonics’ effects on endangered species. EPA’s analyses focus on the species most at risk of extinction, and the results represent a “five-alarm fire,” according to the Center for Biological Diversity’s environmental health director, Lori Ann Bird. EPA identifies 25 insect species and upwards of 160 plants dependent on insect pollination whose existence is most perilous.

    Many studies show that pesticides are a major contributor to the loss of insect biomass and diversity known as the “insect apocalypse,” particularly in combination with climate change. Insects are important as pollinators and as part of the food web that supports all life, so the loss of insects is a threat to life on Earth. The problem is not just insecticides, however. Since butterflies depend on plants—sometimes specific plants, as monarchs depend on milkweeds—the widespread use of herbicides is also a major factor in the loss of butterflies.

    At a more foundational level, pesticides that support industrial agriculture eliminate habitat—either through outright destruction or through toxic contamination. In much of the U.S., agricultural fields are bare for half the year and support a single plant species for the other half. The difference between industrial agriculture and organic agriculture is that through their organic systems plans, organic producers are required to conserve—protect and increase—biodiversity.

    Please ensure that EPA and other agencies need to do their job and protect our most charismatic insects.

    Thank you.

  13. 13
    Sonia Romero Villanueva Says:

    The dangerous and widespread use of toxic pesticides is a major contributing factor to the unprecedented decline in insect populations—what many are calling the “insect apocalypse.”

  14. 14
    Maria Says:

    Butterflies are a key species on our planet. If enough key species die so will you. Care much?

  15. 15
    Maria Says:

    stop.

  16. 16
    Leah Says:

    Please do the right thing. We MUST do all we can to support our Mother and all you reside upon here. Respectfully beseeching! PEACE!!! Leah Berman

  17. 17
    Pam Wilbourn Says:

    PLEASE STOP THESE POISONS THAT KILL ALL OF US!

  18. 18
    Yvonne Fisher Says:

    This goes against the laws of nature and should be banned. We need to start protecting our planet and getting rid of these poisons.

  19. 19
    Dr. Stacey McRae Says:

    STOP the poisoning!

  20. 20
    Michael Seager Says:

    Butterflies—the most charismatic of our insect fauna—are disappearing at an appalling rate, largely due to pesticide use. Recent studies have documented declines of almost 50% from 1990 to 2011 in Europe (with trends continuing), of 58 percent between 2000 and 2009 in the U.K., and of 33% over 1996–2016 in the state of Ohio in the U.S. Even steeper declines have been documented for Monarch butterflies, with an 80 percent decline of Eastern monarchs and 99 percent decline of Western monarchs.

    Last year the EPA admitted that three neonicotinoid pesticides are “likely to adversely affect from two-thirds to over three-fourths of America’s endangered species—1,225 to 1,445 species in all,” including many butterfly species. On May 5 of this year, EPA released new analyses of these neonics’ effects on endangered species. EPA’s analyses focus on the species most at risk of extinction, and the results represent a “five-alarm fire,” according to the Center for Biological Diversity’s environmental health director, Lori Ann Bird. EPA identifies 25 insect species and upwards of 160 plants dependent on insect pollination whose existence is most perilous.

    Many studies show that pesticides are a major contributor to the loss of insect biomass and diversity known as the “insect apocalypse,” particularly in combination with climate change. Insects are important as pollinators and as part of the food web that supports all life, so the loss of insects is a threat to life on Earth. The problem is not just insecticides, however. Since butterflies depend on plants—sometimes specific plants, as monarchs depend on milkweeds—the widespread use of herbicides is also a major factor in the loss of butterflies.

    At a more foundational level, pesticides that support industrial agriculture eliminate habitat—either through outright destruction or through toxic contamination. In much of the U.S., agricultural fields are bare for half the year and support a single plant species for the other half. The difference between industrial agriculture and organic agriculture is that through their organic systems plans, organic producers are required to conserve—protect and increase—biodiversity.

    Please ensure that EPA and other agencies need to do their job and protect our most charismatic insects.

    Thank you.

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